Complete Inspection Service Complete Inspection Service
Home/Radon/Termite
Septic/Water/Well
370 Brush Creek Rd
Irwin, Pa 15642
Phone: 724-523-3950

timothybach@comcast.net
 
  » Home

  » Who We Are

  » What We Inspect

  » ASHI Standards of Practice

  » EPA Radon Map of PA

  » About Mold

  » About Radon

  » About Termites

  » About Septic

  » About Water Quality

  » About Wells

  » Newsletter

  » Request a FREE Quote

  » Make an Appointment

  » Contact Us

  » FAQ

  » Great Links

  » Homeowner Encyclopedia

  » Phone: 724-523-3950
Certified ASHI Member
ASHI Member #: 211267

Virtual Home Inspection Tour

PA DEP
License: 400486

Complete Inspection Service on Zillow

Wells

previous   1 2 3 4 5   next

Basic Information

There are three types of private drinking water wells: dug, driven, and drilled. See the three links below for an explaination and graphic of the types of wells.

Proper well construction and continued maintenance are keys to the safety of your water supply. Your state water-well contractor licensing agency, local health department, or local water system professional can provide information on well construction.

The well should be located so rainwater flows away from it. Rainwater can pick up harmful bacteria and chemicals on the land’s surface. If this water pools near your well, it can seep into it, potentially causing health problems.

Water-well drillers and pump-well installers are listed in your local phone directory. The contractor should be bonded and insured. Make certain your ground water contractor is registered or licensed in your state, if required. If your state does not have a licensing/registration program contact the National Ground Water Association. They have a voluntary certification program for contractors. (In fact, some states use the Association’s exams as their test for licensing.) For a list of certified contractors in your state contact the Association at (614) 898-7791 or (800) 551-7379. There is no cost for mailing or faxing the list to you.

Graphic illustrating the distances considered safe from contaminants to have a Private Drinking Water Well installed.To keep your well safe, you must be sure possible sources of contamination are not close by. Experts suggest the following distances as a minimum for protection — farther is better (see graphic on the right):

  • Septic Tanks, 50 feet
  • Livestock yards, Silos, Septic Leach Fields, 50 feet
  • Patroleum Tanks, Liquid-Tight Manure Storage and Fertilizer Storage and Handling, 100 feet
  • Manure Stacks, 250 feet

Many homeowners tend to forget the value of good maintenance until problems reach crisis levels. That can be expensive. It’s better to maintain your well, find problems early, and correct them to protect your well’s performance. Keep up-to-date records of well installation and repairs plus pumping and water tests. Such records can help spot changes and possible problems with your water system. If you have problems, ask a local expert to check your well construction and maintenance records. He or she can see if your system is okay or needs work.

Protect your own well area. Be careful about storage and disposal of household and lawn care chemicals and wastes. Good farmers and gardeners minimize the use of fertilizers and pesticides. Take steps to reduce erosion and prevent surface water runoff. Regularly check underground storage tanks that hold home heating oil, diesel, or gasoline. Make sure your well is protected from the wastes of livestock, pets, and wildlife.

For additional information see:

previous   1 2 3 4 5   next



© 2010 - 2014 LazrWeb all rights reserved